Forms & Information

Ask An Expert

Ask an expert: Why do nonsmokers get lung cancer?

Q: “I know two women who have lung cancer, and neither of them has ever smoked. How could this happen to them? I thought lung cancer was caused by smoking.”

Forms Instructions

Cancer Conference Instructions

Information for Healthcare Professionals on how to access Providence Cancer Conferences.

Proprietary Health Article

Crizotinib may be a powerful weapon against lung cancer

In early studies, nearly 90 percent of patients with an ALK genetic mutation responded to the drug, which targets metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. – By Rachel E. Sanborn, M.D., co-medical director, Providence Thoracic Oncology Program

Early-phase clinical trials open new opportunities

Providence's involvement with the International Immuno-Oncology Network, along with other early-phase studies, is broadening treatment options for patients with advanced cancers. – By Rachel E. Sanborn, M.D., co-medical director, Providence Thoracic Oncology Program

Living Well

A guide to how our team can help you live well through cancer and beyond.

Promising developments in lung cancer screening

A large national study reports that suspicious findings were three times greater with CT scans than with chest X-rays. – By Rachel E. Sanborn, M.D., medical oncologist

Providence Stop-Smoking Resources

If you smoke, one of the most important steps you can take to improve your health is to quit smoking. Providence Health & Services supports you in this effort. The resources below can help you stop smoking for good.

Put cancer to the test

Mammograms, colonoscopies, PAP smears – these tests are well known and widely used to successfully prevent breast, colon and cervical cancers or to catch them in their earliest, most treatable stages. Just about everybody will, or should, have one or more of these tests routinely in their lifetimes.

Smoking: You CAN kick the habit – and we can help

You already know that smoking is unhealthy. The word has been out since the first Surgeon General’s Report in 1964. One out of four smokers will die from their tobacco addiction. More than 420,000 will die this year. It is the single most preventable cause of death or illness in our country.

Studying apricoxib with erlotinib for lung cancer

A trial testing apricoxib with erlotinib showed longer survival in younger patients with metastatic lung cancer, but failed to meet its goal. – By Rachel E. Sanborn, M.D., medical oncologist

The Benefits of Stopping Smoking

Imagine, for a moment, being inside your lungs, watching the millions of tiny hairs called cilia do their job of filtering out impurities. Then, observe as the smoke from one cigarette invades the lungs, paralyzing the cilia for 24 hours.

The Risks of Smoking - and the Benefits of Quitting

Let’s get specific: Review this chart to remind yourself of the risks of smoking and the benefits of quitting.

Recommended Resource

American Cancer Society: Guide to Quitting Smoking

The American Cancer Society’s guide to quitting smoking including questions people need to know about quitting and the steps to do so.

American Lung Association

The American Lung Association website is a patient and care provider resource with information about respiratory illnesses from asthma to emphysema. Includes causes, warning signs and symptoms, research and patient care treatment resources.

Healthfinder.gov: Smoking Cessation

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services resource page on Smoking Cessation including a quick guide to healthy living and tools to quit.

Medline Plus: Quitting Smoking

U.S. National Library of Medicine Medline Plus topic tool on quitting smoking. Provides a guide, overview, research and resources.

Medline Plus: Smoking

U.S. National Library of Medicine Medline Plus topic tool on what smoking is and does to the body.

National Cancer Institute Prevention and Cessation of Cigarette Smoking: Control of Tobacco Use

National Cancer Institute’s overview of Prevention and steps for how to get into a cessation program.

National Cancer Institute Smoking Quitline

National Cancer Institute’s page on free resources available to help someone quit smoking, including the national Quit Line.

Quitnet

Quitnet is an online community dedicated to quitting smoking. It includes a community room, resources, tools and support for people who want to quit online.