Women's and children's clinical trials

Also known as: Clinical trials, women's and children's

New treatments must prove to be safe and effective in scientific studies before they can be made widely available to patients. By performing clinical trials, we learn which treatments are more effective than others. These trials help find new and better treatments for our patients.

Current clinical trials:
Vaginal Ultrasound Cerclage Trial
Principal Investigator: Mark Tomlinson MD

This multicenter randomized clinical trial of cerclage in women with a prior spontaneous preterm birth who have a shortened cervical length < 25 mm at 16 0 to 226 weeks’ gestation will determine if this surgical intervention decreases the incidence of preterm delivery prior to 35 weeks’ gestation. Providence St. Vincent is a clinical site for this national trial, which is administered by the Center for Research in Women’s Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The overall project is funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Providence Women and Children’s Health Research Center supports and conducts research designed to improve the health of women, newborns and children. As in integral component of the Providence Women and Children’s Program, the Research Center focuses on the clinical priorities of patients, families and physicians. The Research Center facilitates participation in all areas of medical research, including clinical trials, health services research, outcomes research, quality improvement and patient safety studies.

Forms Instructions

Providence Women and Children’s Health Research Center brochure

The Providence Women and Children’s Health Research Center conducts research designed to improve the health of women, newborns and children.

Recommended Resource

ClinicalTrials.gov Frequently Asked Questions

Choosing to participate in a clinical trial is an important personal decision. The following frequently asked questions provide detailed information about clinical trials. In addition, it is often helpful to talk to a physician, family members, or friends about deciding to join a trial. After identifying some trial options, the next step is to contact the study research staff and ask questions about specific trials.

ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov gives you information about a trial's purpose, who may participate, locations, and phone numbers for more details. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.

National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases Research: Research and clinical trials

Links to Federal and non-federal information about research into rare diseases including ORDR-supported research. When you enter most of the Web sites listed below, you will leave the ORDR Web site. Please return to find more information about research resources, scientific conferences, genetics information and services, and other related information.