Weight management

Also known as: obesity, weight problems, overeating, emotional eating, nutrition

Ready to lose weight? We can help.

Weight management classes
For information call Providence Resource Line at 503-574-6595, or visit www.providence.org/classes.

  • Changing from the Inside Out: Resolve Emotional Eating  Gain new insight into emotional eating and develop new skills for resolving it in this 10-week group program.

Outpatient counseling
Discover a new approach to weight management that includes personal nutrition counseling, medically
prescribed diets and an individualized weight management program. Learn more about Providence Nutrition Services.

Fitness and wellness classes
Pick from a variety of high- to low-impact movement, step, resistance training, circuit training, water aerobics, yoga, Pilates, ball exercise and gentle-paced exercise. In addition, classes and forums on general wellness topics, including smoking cesssation, senior health and women’s wellness, are available. For details, call Providence Resource Line, 503-574-6595, or visit www.providence.org/classes.

Ask An Expert

Ask an Expert: Balancing cardio workouts with active recovery

Q: Would it be a bad thing to do daily cardio workouts without any days off? I've been doing about 20 to 50 minutes of cardio a day for the past three months in hope of getting results quickly. I don't want to delay getting my new body, but I also don't want to cause any problems.

Ask an Expert: Beginning an exercise program

Q: "Year after year, I make a New Year's resolution to start exercising. And I never keep it up past about March. What can I do differently this year to finally succeed?"

Ask an expert: Benefits of berries

Q: Can berries really help to reduce my cholesterol?

Answer provided by Maureen Sprague and Kelly Chambers, clinical dietitians, Providence Hood River Memorial Hospital.

Ask an Expert: Bouncing back after time off from exercise

Q: How long does it take to get out of shape? I couldn’t exercise for a while in December, and am wondering how much my fitness level may have declined. When I get back to the gym, how long would it take to get back in shape?

Ask an Expert: Can a person eat too much fruit?

Q: Health experts tell us to eat lots of fruits and veggies, but can a person eat too much fruit? On an average day, I eat about 2-1/2 cups of grapes, two apples, two pears and, at dinner, two servings of vegetables. I’m trying to lose a little weight and am worried that fruit may be deceptively high in calories and sugar.

Ask an Expert: Can supplements help increase muscle mass?

Q: “I’m an 18-year-old male and I would like to start working out to gain mass, as well as definition. What would be the best and safest supplement to use to get quick results?”

Ask an Expert: Can supplements substitute for strength training?

Q: “I am a very skinny 16-year-old and I want to gain muscle. The problem is, I don’t have enough time to lift weights or run regularly. Are there any vitamins or nutritional supplements that would help me gain muscle without exercise? If so, which ones do you recommend?”

Ask an Expert: Cardio workouts you can do at home

"I'm a 17-year-old boy, and I'm looking for a challenging cardio exercise that I can do in my apartment. I lift weights three times a week, so I'm looking for something that will let my muscles rest while pumping up my heart rate.”

Ask an Expert: Changes to the food pyramid’s carb recommendations

Q: Is the amount of carbohydrates recommended by the current USDA Food Guide Pyramid too high? It seems like more and more evidence is showing that many carbs contribute to obesity and other health problems.

Answer from Terese Scollard, R.D., L.D., M.B.A., Regional Clinical Nutrition Manager:

Ask an Expert: Counting calories

Q: How important is it to watch calories if I want to lose weight? It seems most diet plans today focus on total fat intake, or the total amount of protein vs. carbohydrates. Do I still need to pay attention to calories?

Forms Instructions

Request Nutrition Services

Please complete the following form if you are interested in scheduling any of the following nutrition services:

  • Special diet counseling
  • Weight management
  • Nutrition counseling for children with special health care needs
  • Medical nutrition therapy

Proprietary Health Article

Bicycle training schedule

The schedule below provides a guide to training for a 24-mile event, such as the Providence Bridge Pedal.

Twelve resolutions for real health improvement

Forget crash diets, miracle supplements and infomercial exercise gizmos. If you are tired of feeling tired, sick of getting sick, and over being overweight, here are 12 New Year's resolutions that will help you make real, lasting improvements in your health.

Your April resolution: Get some sleep

If you’ve been following along with our 2011 monthly resolutions for better health, then you’ve made some impressive changes in your life in just three months: you’ve had a thorough health checkup, kicked tobacco out of your life, and started a lifelong exercise habit. Give yourself a big high-five – I know that not all of these were easy to do. By comparison, you should be able to accomplish April’s resolution in your sleep.

Your August resolution: Make water your beverage of choice

This month, your resolution is to make water your main beverage.

Your December resolution: Manage your stress

Much has been written about the harmful effects of stress on the heart, the immune system, the digestive system, the reproductive system, the lungs, the muscles – even the skin. But if you ask me, the most devastating effect is the toll that stress takes on your mood and quality of life. 

Your July resolution: Eat a salad every day

If you’re looking for an easy way to improve your health, your weight and your diet, make a resolution this month to turn over a new leaf.

Your June resolution: Replace refined foods with whole foods

When whole grains get refined to make white flour, or apples get processed to make juice, we miss out on one of the most valuable components of the original whole foods: fiber.

Your March resolution: Get up and march

It takes about 21 days to turn new behaviors into habits that will stick with you. This month, take 21 days to build an exercise habit.

Your May resolution: Eat breakfast every day

Mom always said that eating a good breakfast is the best way to start the day. If only more of us had listened. Only about half of American adults under age 55 eat breakfast every day. Those who skip it often do so in the mistaken belief that it’s an easy way to drop calories and weight. But research shows the exact opposite effect: people who skip breakfast weigh an average of seven pounds more than people who eat breakfast. Adding breakfast to your daily schedule can result in a weight loss of four pounds in just a few months.

Recommended Resource

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Article on Dietary Energy Density

Article: Dietary energy density in the treatment of obesity: a year-long trial comparing 2 weight-loss diets.

American Journal of Preventative Medicine: Weight Loss During the Intensive Intervention Phase of the Weight-Loss Maintenance Trial

To improve methods for long-term weight management, the Weight Loss Maintenance (WLM) trial, a four-center randomized trial, was conducted to compare alternative strategies for maintaining weight loss over a 30-month period. This paper describes methods and results for the initial 6-month weight-loss program (Phase I).

Annual Review of Nutrition-Successful Weight Loss Maintenance

Abstract  Obesity is now recognized as a serious chronic disease, but there is pessimism about how successful treatment can be. A general perception is that almost no one succeeds in long-term maintenance of weight loss.

Beverage Guidance Panel site

The Beverage Guidance Panel was assembled to provide guidance on the relative health and nutritional benefits and risks of various beverage categories. 

Bicycle Transportation Alliance

Since 1990, the non-profit Bicycle Transportation Alliance (BTA) has opened roads and minds to cycling, working to promote bicycle use and to improve bicycling conditions throughout the state of Oregon.

Fruits and Veggies More Matters Website

Online resource with tips for incorporating more fruits and veggies in your diet, preventing childhood obesity and other health information.

Good Morning America Book Excerpt on “Mindless Eating”

In his new book, Brian Wansink, a food psychology professor at Cornell University, explains why we eat with our eyes and not with our stomach, and how this can affect our weight. 

The following is an excerpt from "Mindless Eating."