Forms & Information

Ask An Expert

After breast cancer: Preventing lymphedema

Lymphedema may affect up to 60 percent of women after breast cancer treatment. This abnormal accumulation of fluid, or “edema,” is caused by a blockage of the lymphatic system. Often first noticed as a swelling, heaviness or tightness in the arm, hand, wrist, fingers, breast or torso on the same side as the affected breast, it can happen right after surgery or radiation, or years later.

Ask an Expert: Benign breast lumps and breast cancer risk

Q. I recently had a benign breast lump removed. It turned out to be a “fibroadenoma,” and my doctor said it was totally benign. Still, I’m worried – does this mean I’m at an increased risk of breast cancer?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center:

Ask an Expert: Breast cancer growth rate

Q: How long does it take for breast cancer to grow? My doctor just examined my breasts a month ago (no lumps), and today I found a lump. Is it possible that breast cancer could have developed so quickly?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center:

Ask an Expert: Breast cancer in men

Q. I didn’t realize until recently that men can also get breast cancer. How common is it? If the women in my family have a history of breast cancer, should I be concerned?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center: 

Ask an Expert: Breast self-examinations

Q. I’m a young woman who tries to do breast self exams (BSE's) every month. But I often put them off because they make me so nervous. I just heard that not all health care organizations recommend monthly BSE's. What do you say?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center:

Ask an Expert: Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

Q. I've just been diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS.) I've heard it described as "stage 0" breast cancer. What does that mean? How worried should I be?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center:

Ask an Expert: HRT for breast cancer survivors

Q. I am a breast cancer survivor. Is it safe for me to take hormone replacement therapy (HRT)?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center at Providence Portland Medical Center:

Ask an Expert: Tamoxifen vs. Arimidex?

Q: What can you tell me about Arimidex vs. tamoxifen? Should a person on tamoxifen switch to Arimidex? And is there any benefit to taking Arimidex after five years on tamoxifen?

Answer from the expert staff of breast cancer research at the Robert W. Franz Cancer Research Center in the Earle A. Chiles Research Institute at Providence Cancer Center.

Ipilimumab among treatment advances for metastatic melanoma

Many different systemic therapies have been tested for melanoma over the past 50 years, with generally disappointing results. The phase 3 study of ipilimumab was the first to show a survival benefit for any medical therapy in melanoma. – By Brendan Curti, M.D., medical director, Providence Biotherapy Program, Providence Melanoma Program

Forms Instructions

Bringing out the big guns to kill cancer

Technology opens new doors for combining radiation and immunotherapy.

Earle A. Chiles Reasearch Institute Summer Research Program

The Earle A. Chiles Research Institute offers a summer research program for undergraduate students who are seriously considering a career in biomedical sciences. The program offers direct hands-on research experience in one of the EACRI research laboratories.

Prostate cancer research gets a boost

Prostate cancer, once it spreads to lymph nodes and bones, generally is not curable. But basic and clinical researchers at Providence are working on this challenge.

Clinical publications

Learn clinical best practices and the latest advances in techniques, treatments, technology and research. Newsletter articles are reviewed by physician editorial boards and are written by Providence specialists in brain, spine, cancer, orthopedics, and heart and vascular medicine.

Proprietary Health Article

Advances in prostate cancer immunotherapy at Providence

As knowledge about the immune system explodes, so does the potential of innovative treatments. – By Brendan Curti, M.D., medical director, Providence Genitourinary Oncology Research

Expert Q&A: Breakthroughs in prostate cancer research

Answers provided by Brendan Curti, M.D., oncologist and prostate cancer researcher, Providence Cancer Center.

Groundbreaking immunotherapy: More tailored, less toxic treatments

Inside your body, standing at attention in your blood, tissues, and organs, there are millions of tiny troopers mobilized against invaders.

New system therapies emerge for liver cancer

A study at Providence Cancer Center builds on the success of sorafenib. – By Todd S. Crocenzi, medical oncologist and researcher

Prostate cancer and PSA: Should your patient get screened?

Oncologist and researcher Brendan Curti, M.D., discusses the benefits and limitations of the prostate-specific antigen test – and which patient groups can benefit from annual screening.

Providence Cancer Center's global reach, fall 2011

Two of Providence Cancer Center’s top researchers were invited to China in October to talk about advances in immunotherapy, while others spoke in Italy and Chile. Here’s a partial list of our specialists’ appearances and publications.

Studies bring clarity to combination therapies for colorectal cancer

Recent trials have brought some consistency back to integrating EGFR antagonists in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. – By Todd S. Crocenzi, M.D., medical oncologist and researcher

Whole genome sequencing: Personalized medicine’s next step

We’re transitioning from single gene mutation testing to mapping and decoding whole genomes – a leap forward in treatment planning. – Carlo Bifulco, M.D, pathologist

Colorectal cancer risks: tobacco, obesity and inactivity

Once again, tobacco use is firmly established as a cause of cancer, this time, colorectal cancer. – By Todd S. Crocenzi, medical oncologist and researcher

Recommended Resource

American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society’s home page with links to all types of cancer, symptoms, treatment options, statistics trials and ways to contribute. 

American Cancer Society: Cancer staging

American Cancer Society’s description and explanation of staging cancer. Staging is the process of finding out how much cancer there is in the body and where it is located. It is how the doctor learns the stage of a person's cancer. Doctors use this information to plan treatment and to help find out a person's outlook (prognosis). 

National Cancer Institute

National Cancer Institute home page with links to all cancer topics, clinical trial information, statistics, research and treatment information.

National Cancer Institute: Biological Therapies for Cancer - Questions and Answers

Biological therapies use the body's immune system to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that may be caused by some cancer treatments.

National Cancer Institute Physician Data Query

The National Cancer Institute’s comprehensive cancer database contains summaries on a wide range of cancer topics, a registry of more than 8,000 open and 19,000 closed cancer clinical trials from around the world and a directory of professionals who provide genetics services.

National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases Research: Research and clinical trials

Links to Federal and non-federal information about research into rare diseases including ORDR-supported research. When you enter most of the Web sites listed below, you will leave the ORDR Web site. Please return to find more information about research resources, scientific conferences, genetics information and services, and other related information.

Wayne D. Kuni and Joan E. Kuni Foundation

The mission of the Wayne D. Kuni and Joan E. Kuni Foundation is to support medical research, especially for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer

CancerCare.org

Cancer Care is a national nonprofit that provides free, professional support services for anyone affected by cancer.

ClinicalTrials.gov Frequently Asked Questions

Choosing to participate in a clinical trial is an important personal decision. The following frequently asked questions provide detailed information about clinical trials. In addition, it is often helpful to talk to a physician, family members, or friends about deciding to join a trial. After identifying some trial options, the next step is to contact the study research staff and ask questions about specific trials.

Columbia River Oncology Program

The Columbia River Oncology Program is a Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) opened in 1987 and is managed by NCI. Consortium affiliates include health care systems and providers in the metropolitan areas of Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash.

ClinicalTrials.gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov gives you information about a trial's purpose, who may participate, locations, and phone numbers for more details. This information should be used in conjunction with advice from health care professionals.

Cancer.net (AKA: People Living with Cancer)

Oncologist-approved cancer information from the American Society of Clinical Oncology