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Ask An Expert

Ask an Expert: C-reactive Protein (CRP) Testing

I read in the news recently about a blood test involving C-reactive protein that can predict your risk of heart disease.  How does this test differ from cholesterol screening?  Should I ask my doctor to give me this test when I go for my next physical?

Ask an Expert: Lowering blood pressure without pills

"I was recently diagnosed with high blood pressure. I'd like to lower it without medications, if I can. What are the best non-drug ways to reduce blood pressure? Is it possible to do this without popping pills?"

Forms Instructions

Heart to Heart Patient Education Guide

In this guide, you will find important information that will help you better understand what to expect while you are at the hospital and what to expect when you return home following open heart surgery and/or a heart attack.

Living with Congestive Heart Failure

This book contains helpful information and tips for those who are at risk of developing or who already have heart failure. We hope this book aids your comfort and healing by teaching you how to manage this condition. Your physician and cardiac team are available to assist if you need help or have questions about the appropriateness of this book for you.

Preventing Cardiac Risk: Cholesterol in the blood

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that can be found in all parts of your body. It aids in the production of cell membranes, some hormones, and vitamin D. The cholesterol in your blood comes from two sources: the foods you eat and your liver. However, your liver makes all of the cholesterol your body needs.

Proprietary Health Article

Preventing Cardiac Risk: Lifestyle changes

Lifestyle changes that will help you reduce your chance of heart attack or stroke.

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Before starting an exercise program

It is always important to consult with your physician before starting an exercise program. This is particularly true if any of the following apply to your current medical condition:

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Calculating calories and fat grams

To determine the number of calories and fat grams you need to consume each day in order to lose or gain weight, consult your physician or a registered dietitian. To maintain your current weight, follow the formula below.

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Components of food

If you are trying to make heart-healthy changes to your lifestyle and diet, it is helpful to know some basics about nutrition – starting with the components of food.

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Designing an exercise program

Regular, aerobic physical activity increases a person’s capacity for exercise and plays a role in prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Aerobic exercise may also help to lower blood pressure.

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Determining your Body Mass Index

Determining how much you should weigh is not a simple matter of looking at an insurance height-weight chart, but includes considering the amount of bone, muscle, and fat in your body's composition. The amount of fat is the critical measurement.

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Risks of physical inactivity

What health risks are associated with physical inactivity? Lack of physical activity has clearly been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. 

Reducing Cardiac Risk: Smoking and cardiovascular disease

Facts about smoking and cardiovascular disease:

Tips for heart-healthy eating

Following are common questions about the relationship of nutrition to heart health, answered by Valerie Edwards, MS, RD, LD, outpatient nutrition therapist, Providence Nutrition Services.

Recommended Resource

American Heart Association: Heart Attack Risk Assessment

It's essential that you measure your risk of heart disease and make a plan for how to prevent it in the near future. Use this tool to help you assess your risk of having a heart attack or dying from coronary heart disease in the next 10 years. 

American Heart Association: Managing Stress for People with Heart Failure

American Heart Association elaborates on how manage stress in your daily life to maintain a healthy heart. 

American Heart Association Website

The American Heart Association website is a patient and care provider resource with information about heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

Health Central: MyHeartCentral.com

HealthCentral's mission is to empower millions of people to improve and take control of their health and well-being. Our 35+ sites provide clinical resources and real-life support to those with life-changing conditions. Our wellness resources and tools help people to live healthier, more fulfilled lives. We are honored to serve more than 16.4 million visitors each month.

Mended Hearts

Mended Hearts, a national nonprofit organization affiliated with the American Heart Association, has been offering the gift of hope to heart disease patients, their families and caregivers for more than 50 years. 

Smart CHOICES for Health

Smart CHOICES for Health is a unique book that takes a powerful, non-dieting approach to weight management. Through reflections and hands-on activities, you’ll develop new skills for eating healthier, being more active and dealing with the emotional issues that surround weight and food.

Stay Young at Heart

Stay Young at Heart includes heart-healthy recipes listed by type of meal.

Your Guide to Lowering Your Blood Pressure with DASH

What you choose to eat affects your chances of developing high blood pressure, or hypertension (the medical term). Recent studies show that blood pressure can be lowered by following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan—and by eating less salt, also called sodium.

CardioSource: American College of Cardiology

American College of Cardiology website that includes resources for care providers.