Forms & Information

Ask An Expert

[VIDEO] Excruciating back pain gone immediately

Watch this KPTV report about a patient who was in the worst pain in his life. His minimally invasive spine surgery cured him "100 percent" and he was out on the town that evening.

[VIDEO] Tips for a healthy brain

What can you do to maintain a healthy brain while you age?

Women and Memory Loss

Forgetfulness tends to increase with age, but there's a big difference between normal absent-mindedness and the type of memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease. 

Using Aquatic Therapy to Recover From a Stroke

Answers from Kathleen Cutter, physical therapist with Providence Rehabilitation Services:

Providence offers the most advanced care for brain tumors

Learn about the warning signs and treatment options for brain tumors.

Practice tip: diagnosing tremors

Kresa-Reahl, Kiren, M.D., neurologist, Providence Center for Parkinson’s Disease, explains the difference between action tremors and rest tremors and what to look for.

Practice tip: MS warning signs

Kresa-Reahl, Kiren, M.D., neurologist, Providence Multiple Sclerosis Center, provides tips on diagnosing numbness and when to order testing to check for multiple sclerosis.

Pioneering stroke care video

Learn how Providence built a telestroke network to improve stroke care in communities in Oregon and Washington.

Memory and Alzheimer’s disease

Is Alzheimer’s disease preventable? What are the best ways to keep your brain sharp? Hear what a Providence brain expert has to say.

#CuriousBrain Event Twitter Highlights

Read highlights from The Curious Workings of Your Brain, presented by Stanley Cohan, M.D., Ph.D., Michael Mega, M.D., Ph.D., and Richard Rosenbaum, M.D.

Curious about brain health? Eat smart.

To maintain a sharp mind and a healthy brain, try leaning more toward Brussels sprouts than brownies. So advises Michael Mega, M.D., Ph.D., medical director of Providence Cognitive Assessment Clinic.

Best practices in Parkinson's disease care

The American Academy of Neurology recommends 10 quality care measures for treating Parkinson’s disease, yet some aspects of care may be overlooked. Here are seven more that every provider who treats the disease should consider. – Richard Rosenbaum, M.D., neurologist

Brain Watch Event - Twitter Highlights

Bringing science education to life, Providence School Outreach Program hosted more than 125 Portland-area high school students to watch a live “Brain Watch” surgery as Dr. Vivek Deshmukh, neurosurgeon with Providence Brain and Spine Institute, clamped a brain aneurysm in a 4-hour operation.

Ask an expert: Managing migraines

What is “migraine brain”? Could some sinus headaches actually be migraines? Is there any way to head off chronic migraines? Providence neurologists answer questions about migraines.

Ask an Expert: Stroke vs. TIA

“Is a TIA truly a stroke, or is it caused by other problems? What is the process for finding a good specialist?"

Forms Instructions

When should a patient be referred to Providence Cognitive Assessment Clinic?

Not all absentmindedness is dementia. Here's a handy chart to help you determine if your patient needs further testing.

In Practice: John Zurasky, M.D.

As part of an ongoing series, Providence profiles John Zurasky, M.D., stroke neurologist and neurointensivist with Providence Brain and Spine Institute.

In Practice: Profiles of Providence physicians

Patients know them as doctors. Physicians know them as colleagues.Through our ongoing series, we see these Providence providers in another light.

In Practice: Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., FACS

The neurosurgeon once "more powerful than Cheney."

In Practice: Ann-Marie Yost, M.D.

What sets Providence's Ann-Marie Yost, M.D., apart from 94 percent of neurosurgeons and why one case stays with her.

Providence Telestroke Network map

Miles away… and by your side. See the map of all telestroke locations.

Program sheets: For patients, family and friends

Printable sheets describing Providence Brain and Spine Institute services.

Providence specialists publish, present clinical expertise

From publishing in medical journals to presenting at peer conferences, Providence Brain and Spine Institute experts have been active on a national and international scale.

Program sheets: for medical professionals

Printable sheets with information on Providence Brain and Spine Institute specialty programs.

The Curious Workings of the Brain - video and recap

Is Alzheimer’s preventable? Does MS occur more in certain states? Why does Parkinson’s cause tremors? Get the highlights.

The surgical advantages of intraoperative MRI

New technology integrates the state-of-the-art neurosurgical operating room with advanced neuroimaging.

Clinical publications

Learn clinical best practices and the latest advances in techniques, treatments, technology and research. Newsletter articles are reviewed by physician editorial boards and are written by Providence specialists in brain, spine, cancer, orthopedics, and heart and vascular medicine.

Brain tumor-free, a life rebounding

Two years after a Providence surgeon removed the tumor that disrupted her life, Carol Fichtner is thriving.

Neuro bi-plane technology gets even more precise

Providence Portland Medical Center now offers an advanced neuro procedure room with 3-D mapping and CT scan overlay.

Now surgeons can see scans through a microscope

Developed at Providence Brain and Spine Institute, microscope-integrated radiology lets surgeons instantly view pre-op images through the surgical microscope. – By Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., neurosurgeon

Your complete guide to spine surgery

A pre- and post-operative guide for patients planning for spine surgery at Providence Portland, St. Vincent or Willamette Falls medical centers. 

Tell back pain: It's time to move on

More than 80 percent of painful low-back flare-ups get better on their own within six to eight weeks. Great to know – but what are you supposed to do in the meantime? How can you get past the pain, speed up the healing and tell back pain that it’s time to move on?

Proprietary Health Article

[VIDEO] Providence Telestroke Network in Action

Watch this video depicting the lifesaving power of telestroke.

Where doctors come to heal themselves

The significance of the Kleenex boxes placed on every tabletop isn’t apparent at first. But 15 minutes into this lunchtime gathering of doctors, nurses and a host of other health care workers, the reason becomes clear.

Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: indications for treatment

Unruptured intracranial aneurysms are common incidental findings on brain imaging. The challenge is to determine which aneurysms pose the greatest risks … and why. – By Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., neurosurgeon

Use of Acute Stroke Registry to Improve Care Profile of Receptive Stroke Programs

Researchers surveyed hospitals to ask whether ongoing data completeness reports and monthly comparative quality reports were used to make changes in the acute care process.These self-reports were then confirme by using the registry data to construct objective run-chart measures over 12 months.Results showed several programmatic characteristics that distinguished programs that used quality reports to make improvements.

Intractable epilepsy: the surgical option

New noninvasive assessments can help determine surgical candidates and locate the precise area of the brain causing the seizures. – By Julia Toub, M.D., epileptologist

How real is failed back surgery syndrome?

Further testing often reveals that persistent pain has a treatable cause. – By J. Rafe Sales, M.D., orthopedic spine surgeon

Providence inScope: Breaking melanoma's grip

The September issue of Providence inScope, our clinical news magazine, examines a combination therapy that may hold promise for people with advanced melanoma.

Providence inScope: Palliative care for the living

The March 2013 issue of our clinical news magazine highlights how palliative care is helping patients long before the end of life. Also, new surgical options for herniated disks, settling into a medical home and why one ED doc gets high patient-satisfaction scores.

Providence inScope: Treating brain aneurysms

The November issue of Providence inScope, our clinical news magazine, examines a new stent to repair complex brain aneurysms; plus, treating HPV-related oral cancers.

Publishing, posters and presentations

Research projects by Providence Brain and Spine Institute specialists David Antezana, M.D., Stanley Cohan, M.D., Ph.D., and Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., FACS, gain national platform.

Parkinsons disease: When is deep brain stimulation an option

When medications no longer work, this surgical approach is easing symptoms for many patients with this degenerative disease. – Elise Anderson,M.D., neurologist

Questions and Answers About Stroke

Questions and answers about stroke with Ted Lowenkopf, M.D., and Lisa Yanase, M.D., Providence Brain and Spine Institute.

Research aims to limit the damaging effects of stroke

Providence is participating in several high-profile studies testing new interventions and combination therapies for acute ischemic, hemorrhagic stroke. – Ted J. Lowenkopf, M.D., medical director, Providence Stroke Center

Relieving the pain of a cervical herniated disk

Arm pain from a compressed nerve often can be controlled conservatively, but if the pain is severe and lasting, new surgical options can offer permanent relief with faster recovery times. – J. Rafe Sales, M.D., orthopedic spine surgeon

Maximizing minimally invasive brain tumor surgery

Colloid cysts are rare and potentially deadly, but with special training, endoscopic resection can be done swiftly and easily. – By Pankaj A. Gore, M.D., neurosurgeon

The advantages and limits of electromyography

EMG exams are valuable for diagnosing peripheral neurological disorders in many cases, but not all. – By Steven A. Day, M.D., neurologist

The connection between neuropathy and IGM

A growing body of research suggests that impaired glucose metabolism is a factor. – By Joshua Johnson, M.D., neurologist

Treating motor impairment in Parkinson’s disease

In the past four decades pharmacological progress has been spectacular, so now physicians and patients may choose among multiple options. Providence Center for Parkinson’s Disease follows these decision-making guides. – Richard Rosenbaum, M.D., neurologist

The next-generation brain aneurysm repair

Beyond coiling and clipping: a newly approved braided stent offers a solution for treating complicated brain aneurysms. – By Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., neurosurgeon

Disk problems causing back pain? Think again

Facet joints may be the Rodney Dangerfield of the spine, but when it comes to causing back problems they deserve more respect. – By Jeffrey P. Johnson, M.D., neurosurgeon

Could new therapies slow or even stop Alzheimer’s disease?

Anti-amyloid agents are the subject of two clinical trials. If they delay Alzheimer’s by just five years, the disease’s prevalence will be halved. – By Michael Mega, M.D., Ph.D., neurologist

Case study: A rare brain tumor, a rare procedure

A young woman is diagnosed with a malignant cartilaginous tumor located deep in the skull base. In this case, a novel endoscopic endonasal approach proved superior to traditional techniques. – Pankaj Gore, M.D., neurosurgeon, and Edsel Kim, M.D., ear, nose and throat surgeon

Clinical trial examines unruptured brain AVMs

Providence investigators Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., and John Zurasky, M.D., are studying treatment options for arteriovenous malformations.

Breaking the back pain cycle

Of all the reasons why people go to the doctor, back pain is second only to the common cold. Genetics, stressful jobs and lifestyles, poor posture and body mechanics, weak muscles, and extra pounds set most of us up for back problems sooner or later.

Brain tumors and epilepsy

Seizure is often the first clinical symptom of a brain neoplasm, especially in cases of low-grade neoplasms. – Paula Gerber, M.D., neurologist; medical director, Providence Neurodiagnostic Services

Brain aneurysm: When to clip, when to coil

Clipping is favored in patients in otherwise good health, younger patients and those with a complete third-nerve palsy. Coiling is favored for older patients in poor health with multiple medical co-morbidities. This patient in this case study got both treatments. – By Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., neurosurgeon

Back pain: When it's time to call a specialist

Aging, lifestyle and heredity all play a role in back problems, but if pain persists despite home treatments, specialists can help diagnose and treat the cause. – By Gloria M. Dagenais, RN

An evidence-based guide to treating diabetic neuropathy pain

Recent guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations on the best (and worst) pain medications. – By Joshua Johnson, M.D., neurologist

A crash, a recovery, a brain aneurysm

Heath Munger's brain aneurysm was dangerous and complex. A skilled Providence neurosurgeon and a new device repaired the damage and gave this father a future.

A pinched nerve brings agony; a surgeon brings relief

Rachel Frazier is a jogger, golfer and power walker. She’s used to the odd muscle and joint aches that come with being physically active. But the pain that came the winter of 2012 was something entirely different. It started in her upper left arm and radiated downward to her thumb, and it kept getting worse.

A need for speed promotes neurointensive care

Studies find that the relatively new care model for critically ill neurological patients decreases mortality and shortens hospital stays. – By John Zurasky, M.D., neurointensivist

A reversible dementia

Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be mistaken for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, but with appropriate treatment, its symptoms can be relieved or even reversed. – Ann-Marie Yost, M.D., neurosurgeon, Providence Brain and Spine Institute

A treatment for “untreatable” back pain

For some patients with persistent pain, spinal cord stimulation provides relief when other options have failed. – Martin Baggenstos, M.D., neurosurgeon

Endoscopic approaches to the skull base

Gaining access to the interface between the brain and sinuses used to require a risky and often disfiguring craniotomy. But the past 10 years have brought dramatic advancements in minimally invasive surgical techniques. – Edsel U. Kim, head and neck surgeon

Eight ways to help your patients with MS

A range of therapies, from treating depression to prescribing exercise, can help patients maintain full lives free of devastating disability. – Stanley Cohan, M.D., Ph.D., medical director, Providence Multiple Sclerosis Center

New hope for brain hemorrhage: CLEAR III trial

The condition causes dread for emergency physicians, but a study is examining a new therapy that may improve outcomes. – By Lisa Yanase, M.D., stroke neurologist

Neurocritical care unit treats the most challenging conditions

The new 12-bed neurocritical care unit at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center provides the highest level of care for patients with critical neurological illnesses. – John Zurasky, M.D., medical director

Recommended Resource