News

Art as therapy: Painter Amanda Russel shares her skills, history at Providence Portland Medical Center

April 10, 2014

Amanda became paralyzed at age 23 and spent weeks in Providence Acute Rehabilitation Center. She has returned to the unit, this time as a volunteer, and she helps patients through art therapy.

Stroke rehabilitation made more enjoyable

May 14, 2012

Recovering from stroke can be a grueling process, but state-of-the-art technology – and some unexpected tools – can help people recover mobility.

Acute Rehab Outcomes Report - Outstanding Results

March 22, 2012

The 2011 Providence Medford Medical Center Rehabilitation Outcomes Report shows Providence in the top quarter of rehabilitation programs in the country. Of note, more of our patients return to their homes than national benchmarks. What does that mean to you? It means, patients return home with greater independence and peace of mind. Providence Medford Medical Center - the only accredited primary stroke center of excellence by the Joint Commission, and a nationally recognized inpatient rehabilitation center by CARF, the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.

New name for Providence’s comprehensive neurological and spine services

November 01, 2011

Providence Brain Institute’s name has changed. The new name, Providence Brain and Spine Institute, communicates the breadth of services offered by the institute.

Wii rehabilitation therapy

May 25, 2011

Rehabilitation experts at Providence are turning to a unique technique to treat patients, Nintendo Wii. See how the Wii can help people recover their mobility.

Alexandra Malusevic fights for her life and her baby's...

April 02, 2011

Twenty-nine weeks pregnant and with tire tracks across her body, she begins an odyssey of horror and hope as she tries to recover while protecting her unborn child.

Providence expert insight into Congresswoman Giffords’ brain-injury

January 10, 2011

Vivek Deshmukh, M.D., F.A.C.S., medical director of Providence Neurointerventional Services, helped Washington Post readers understand brain trauma following the shooting of U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords.