Newborn care services with NICU care

Should you need us, we have the largest neonatal intensive care unit in the northwest. We offer 19 single-family suites, for a capacity of 70 monitored beds.  Many of the infants in the NICU are born prematurely and need special care while they grow. Others are full-term babies who need medical or surgical treatment. We offer an antire team of specialist to care for your newborn, including the following specialties:
  • Anesthesiology
  • Audiology
  • Cardiology
  • Cardiac surgery
  • Development
  • Endocrinology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Genetics
  • Neonatology
  • Nephrology
  • Neurology
  • Neurosurgery
  • Ophthalmology
  • Otolaryngology
  • Plastic surgery
  • Radiology
  • Surgery
  • Urology

Forms Instructions

Bringing baby home: Instructions for home care

Congratulations on your new baby! We've put together a list of helpful information and links to access Providence postpartum care services.

Newborn Hearing Screening

The first two years of a child’s life are the most important for speech and language development. That’s why it’s important to detect hearing problems early. The state of Oregon requires that all newborns be given a hearing test soon after they are born.

Your baby needs a doctor

Before you preregister for your delivery, you must choose a primary care provider for your baby. This provider will coordinate well-baby visits, immunizations and general medical care for your baby for many years to come.

Proprietary Health Article

Providence midwives pair traditional practices with technology

Midwifery has long been an option for women wanting to deliver their babies with minimal medical intervention. Providence Health & Services has paired the personal support of midwifery with the modern comforts of a hospital since 1993.

Medical Staff Guidelines for Periviability Pregnancy Counseling and Medical Treatment of Extremely Premature Infants

The goal of this report is to describe the collaborative formation of rational, practical, medical staff guidelines for the counseling and subsequent care of extremely early-gestation pregnancies and premature infants between 22 and 26 weeks.

Counseling Pregnant Women Who May Deliver Extremely Premature Infants: Medical Care Guidelines, Family Choices, and Neonatal Outcomes

The goal of this report is to describe our experience implementing consensus medical staff guidelines used for counseling pregnant women threatening extremely premature birth and to give an account of family preferences and the immediate outcome of their infants.

Addressing In-Hospital “Falls” of Newborn Infants

Experience of a seven hospital system in Oregon offers a template for understanding how and why infant falls occur in hospitals and how to address the issue.

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