Also known as: Biologic therapy, Biotherapy

Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses the patient's immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct or restore the body's natural defenses against cancer. This type of cancer treatment is also called biotherapy or immunotherapy.

Immunotherapy is a complex and rapidly evolving oncologic treatment. At Providence Cancer Center, we are using a wide range of immunotherapy strategies, including:

  • Antibodies that target tumor antigens
  • Bi-specific antibody molecules that redirect T cells to tumor antigens
  • Immune check point inhibitors
  • Immune co-stimulatory molecules

Forms Instructions

Bringing out the big guns to kill cancer

Technology opens new doors for combining radiation and immunotherapy.

Providence Gastrointestinal Cancer Program -- Multidisciplinary Team

Your multidisciplinary gastrointestinal cancer care team consists of these trained specialists:

Proprietary Health Article

Ask an expert: Immunotherapy and Providence's cancer warriors

For more than 20 years, Providence Cancer Center scientists in Portland have been quietly building international recognition for their pioneering research in immunotherapy, a field that is now leading to new treatments, and possibly cures, for cancer.

Groundbreaking immunotherapy: More tailored, less toxic treatments

Inside your body, standing at attention in your blood, tissues, and organs, there are millions of tiny troopers mobilized against invaders.

Providence Cancer Center integral to rapid progress of new cancer therapies

"In the past five years, we have seen more progress in cancer therapy than in the previous 100 years." – Walter J. Urba, M.D., Ph.D., research director, Providence Cancer Center and Earle A. Chiles Research Institute. Dr. Urba shared this powerful, inspiring statement during the May 25 Creating Hope Dinner to benefit continued research at Providence Cancer Center. This record-breaking event raised nearly $1 million for new research efforts, and we’re pleased to share important updates about our work.

Prostate cancer and PSA: Should your patient get screened?

Oncologist and researcher Brendan Curti, M.D., discusses the benefits and limitations of the prostate-specific antigen test – and which patient groups can benefit from annual screening.

Recommended Resource

American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society’s home page with links to all types of cancer, symptoms, treatment options, statistics trials and ways to contribute.