Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy enables your doctor to examine the lining of your colon (large intestine) for abnormalities by inserting a flexible tube as thick as your finger into your anus and slowly advancing it into the rectum and colon.

Colonoscopy is well-tolerated and rarely causes much pain. You might feel pressure, bloating or cramping during the procedure. Your doctor might give you a sedative to help you relax and better tolerate any discomfort.

You will lie on your side or back while your doctor slowly advances a colonoscope through your large intestine to examine the lining. Your doctor will examine the lining again as he or she slowly withdraws the colonoscope. The procedure itself usually takes 15 to 60 minutes, although you should plan on two to three hours for waiting, preparation and recovery.

Providence Gastrointestinal Center provides state-of-the-art gastroenterology services. Our board-certified gastroenterologists diagnose and treat disorders of the digestive tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon and rectum, pancreas, liver, gallbladder and biliary system. Providence Gastrointestinal Center is part of a comprehensive program at Providence involving medical and surgical specialties.

Ask An Expert

What to expect when you’re prepping (for your colonoscopy)

How many of you cringe at scheduling a colonoscopy because the procedure (for which you’re knocked out) is a total drag? Yeah, we didn’t think so. It’s not the procedure itself that gets you in the gut – it’s the dreaded, much-maligned prep. Find out what works and what doesn't from Ken Flora, M.D., regional co-medical director of Providence Gastrointestinal Center.

Myth-busting colonoscopy: Five reasons it’s not so bad

We hear “colonoscopy” and our bodies clench. The anticipation of the bowel-emptying prep and a scope snaking through our colon evokes strong feelings among even the hardiest of us.

For Jonathan Vinson, M.D., a family physician with Providence Medical Group-The Plaza, getting screened for colorectal cancer is a “no-brainer.”

Colonoscopy: What to know before you go

A few helpful tips from a Providence family practitioner for what to expect before and after a colonoscopy.

Forms Instructions

Proprietary Health Article

Colonoscopy: Helping protect your colorectal health

A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows a doctor to look inside the entire large intestine, including the colon and rectum.

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