Cancer lymphedema therapy

Also known as: Lymphedema therapy, Breast cancer therapy, Post-breast surgery exercise program, Therapy, cancer lymphedema

Providence Health & Services offers a variety of rehabilitation oncology programs for therapy related to breast cancer.

General oncology services

  • Inpatient and outpatient occupational therapy or physical therapy assessment and treatment for safety issues, rehabilitation needs (including general strengthening, range of motion, conditioning) or assistive devices.

Lymphedema program

  • Complete decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) involves bandaging for compression, manual lymphatic drainage and exercise for improved lymph flow, skin care, referral for fitting of compression garments and education to enable self-management of this condition.
  • Treatment options include instruction for using a compression pump or one-time consultation for education on self-care/prevention for those at risk for developing lymphedema.
  • LANA-certified lymphedema therapists

Post-breast surgery exercise program

  • Exercise instruction/progression for restoring normal motion and strength to the neck, torso and arms following breast surgery.
  • Patient education on arm care and resuming functional activities.

Instruction in scar mobilization to restore mobility of the skin and to help achieve normal shoulder girdle motion.

To make a referral or for more information about cancer lymphedema therapy, please contact us.

After illness, injury or disability, people in our community turn to Providence Rehabilitation Services for help in regaining strength and independence. Last year, Providence Rehabilitation served more than 86,000 adults and children.

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After breast cancer: Preventing lymphedema

Lymphedema may affect up to 60 percent of women after breast cancer treatment. This abnormal accumulation of fluid, or “edema,” is caused by a blockage of the lymphatic system. Often first noticed as a swelling, heaviness or tightness in the arm, hand, wrist, fingers, breast or torso on the same side as the affected breast, it can happen right after surgery or radiation, or years later.