Autologous stem cell transplant

Also known as: Stem cell transplant, autologous

Most stem cells are in your bone marrow. You also have some in your blood that circulate from your bone marrow. Bone marrow stem cells turn into red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets to help your body stay healthy. If your bone marrow is attacked by a disease such as leukemia, it can no longer make normal blood cells. In a stem cell transplant, healthy stem cells are placed in your body through an IV to help your bone marrow start to work right.

When the stem cells come from your own blood or bone marrow, it is called an autologous transplant.

Providence Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Program offers treatment for a broad range of diseases, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, acute leukemia and testis cancer.

Forms Instructions

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Program Team

Learn more about the Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Program team.

Proprietary Health Article

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