Our Stories

A long way back from stroke

Surviving a stroke and regaining one’s health depend on many things. Brad Soots, an employee at Providence Neurodevelopmental Center for Children, suffered a severe stroke in May 2010.

A peaceful, blessed goodbye

Providence music-thanatologists offer soothing and spiritually powerful comfort to those nearing the end of life. Thanks to your contributions, this special program now celebrates its first decade.

Creating a better story

Kimberly Goslin, M.D., Ph.D., eases the way for patients who have Lou Gehrig's disease.

Life after melanoma

Two years ago, Chuck Howard had more melanoma tumors than his doctors could count. Thanks to a treatment being developed and tested at Providence, the Salem dentist is making a remarkable recovery.

Michelle Judson’s cancer army

Michelle Judson, has three young children and a husband whose job takes him out of town five days a week. She also has breast cancer. Learn how her family is fighting the disease with an army of support.

Patient stories: All the joys of childhood

A day in the life of a medically fragile child is remarkably like that of other neighborhood kids.

Patient story: I haven't had any new cancers

It’s been 11 years since Clara Harris was diagnosed with kidney cancer; more than 10 years since she had radiation for brain and bone tumors. And it’s been one year since Harris welcomed her first grandchild.

Pow! Man knocks down diabetes!

A patient shares his inspiring story of how he reversed his type 2 diabetes.

Rules of Calculation: One physicist's personal journey of science and healing

It started as a common annoyance – that feeling of water trapped in one's ear. "I know the moment very clearly," says University of Oregon physics professor John J. Toner, Ph.D., reflecting on what he came to find out was the first sign of a rare brain tumor.

Surviving a major brain injury is one thing. Restoring your life and routines is another.

Some people just have that sparkle. You know who they are – the ones full of energy and optimism, the ones who are living life to the fullest. When a health crisis strikes, those attributes may be the best medicine.