Strabismus

Also known as: Crossed-eyes, Walleye, Squint
Strabismus (say "struh-BIZ-mus") is a vision problem in which both eyes do not look at the same point at the same time. Strabismus most often begins in early childhood. It is sometimes called crossed-eyes, walleye or squint.

Normally, the muscles attached to each eye work together to move both eyes in the same direction at the same time. Strabismus occurs when the eye muscles don't work properly to control eye movement. When the eye muscles don't work as they should, the eyes may become misaligned and the brain may not be able to merge what one eye sees with what the other eye sees.

A child rarely outgrows strabismus after it has developed. Without treatment, strabismus can cause permanent vision problems. For example, if the child is not using one eye because it is misaligned, he or she can develop poor vision in that eye (called lazy eye or amblyopia).

Providence Eye Services is the largest provider of surgical eye care in Oregon, offering both routine and complex eye care to patients in the communities we serve. Patients undergoing surgery at Providence can rest assured their care is being performed in a setting well-known for providing compassionate, high-quality care.

Providence partners with many ophthalmologists throughout Oregon to offer comprehensive surgical treatment for a broad range of conditions affecting the eye in children as well as adults. Ophthalmologists are highly trained in the anatomy, physiology and diseases affecting the eye.