Nasopharyngeal cancer

Also known as: Cancer, nasopharyngeal
Nasopharyngeal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the nasopharynx, which is the upper part of the pharynx (throat) behind the nose. The pharynx is a hollow tube about five inches long that starts behind the nose and ends at the top of the trachea (windpipe) and esophagus (the tube that goes from the throat to the stomach).

Air and food pass through the pharynx on the way to the trachea or the esophagus. The nostrils lead into the nasopharynx. An opening on each side of the nasopharynx leads into an ear. Nasopharyngeal cancer most commonly starts in the squamous cells that line the nasopharynx.
Providence Head, Neck and Oral Cancer Program offers world-class care for patients with benign and malignant tumors of the oral cavity (mouth), tongue, pharynx (throat), larynx (voice box), nose, paranasal sinuses, salivary glands and thyroid gland, as well as tumors at the skull base.