Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

Also known as: LAM Lymphangioleimyomatosis, Lymphangioleiomatosis, Pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis, Sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare progressive multisystem disorder that predominantly affects women of childbearing age. It occurs in women who have tuberous sclerosis, and also in women who do not have a heritable genetic disorder. LAM is characterized by the spread and uncontrolled growth (proliferation) of specialized cells (smooth muscle-like LAM cells) in certain organs of the body, especially the lungs, kidney and lymphatics. Common symptoms associated with LAM include coughing and/or difficulty breathing (dyspnea), especially following periods of exercise or exertion. Affected individuals may also experience complications including collapse of a lung or fluid accumulation around the lungs (pleural effusion). The disorder is progressive and, in some cases, may result in chronic respiratory failure.

Providence Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine provides inpatient and outpatient consultation, evaluation and state-of-the-art treatment for a wide range of acute and chronic lung diseases and critical illnesses.