Antiphospholipid syndrome

Also known as: Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome , APLS, APS, Hughes syndrome, PAPS, Primary antiphospholipid syndrome
Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by recurring blood clots (thromboses). Blood clots can form in any blood vessel of the body. The specific symptoms and severity of APS vary greatly from case to case depending upon the exact location of a blood clot and the organ system affected.

APS is characterized by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in the body. Antibodies are specialized proteins produced by the body's immune system to fight infection. In individuals with APS, certain antibodies mistakenly attack healthy tissue.

In APS, antibodies mistakenly attack certain proteins that bind to phospholipids, which are fat molecules that are involved in the proper function of cell membranes. Phospholipids are found throughout the body. The reason these antibodies attack these proteins and the process by which they cause blood clots to form is not known.
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