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Women and Memory Loss

Forgetfulness tends to increase with age, but there's a big difference between normal absent-mindedness and the type of memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease. 

Forms Instructions

Caring for a Person with Alzheimer's Disease: Your Easy-to-Use guide from the National Institute on Aging.

This booklet is free and discusses the following:
  1. Stages of Alzheimer's disease
  2. How to care for a person with Alzheimer's
  3. Caring for yourself
  4. When to get help
  5. Medications and common medical problems
  6. Copping with late stage Alzheimer's

For a hard copy of the booklet, contact the Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center at 1-800-438-4380 or

Home Safety for People with Alzheimer's Disease

This booklet discusses the safety concerns of persons with Alzheimer's disease, safety interventions for the home environment, driving, and planning for emergencies.  It was produced by the National Institutes on Aging Alzheimer's Disease Education and Research (ADEAR) Center.  Hard copies of this booklet are available by calling:  1-800-438-4380 or by online request at

How to Manage Bathing Difficulties

This handout describes common bathing issues and helpful interventions for making it a more enjoyable experience.

When should a patient be referred to Providence Cognitive Assessment Clinic?

Not all absentmindedness is dementia. Here's a handy chart to help you determine if your patient needs further testing.

Proprietary Health Article


Answers to frequently asked questions about the PET/CT procedure.

Recommended Resource

Alzheimer's Association

The Alzheimer's Association is the leading, global voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care and support, and the largest private, nonprofit funder of Alzheimer research.  Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s, and since our founding in 1980, we have moved toward this goal by advancing research and providing support, information and education to those affected by Alzheimer’s and related dementias.